News in Brief


33 Thoroughbreds rescued after owner abandons them

LEXINGTON (AP) — The Lexington Humane Society is caring for 23 Thoroughbreds that were abandoned at a Fayette County boarding stable while another 10 have been placed in homes.

The society’s Ashley Hammond told the Lexington Herald-Leader the man who owned the horses had not paid for their care in months. Animal control stepped in a year ago, finding the horses were not in great health.

Animal control gave the owner a deadline to claim horses before they would be confiscated.

The horses are still being housed at the boarding stable where they were left, but the humane society has taken over the complete responsibility and cost of their care.

The horses will soon be up for adoption. More information on that process is available at lexingtonhumanesociety.org.

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Barbourville voters approve alcohol sales

BARBOURVILLE (AP) — Voters in Barbourville have decided to allow alcohol sales in the city.

WYMT-TV reports a petition began in October to turn the city from “dry” to “wet.” On Tuesday, residents voted 498 to 433 in favor of allowing alcohol sales.

Bob Dunaway, one of the original petitioners, says the city has been “stuck in a rut” since the 1930s. He thinks the vote will give Barbourville a chance to grow and change.

A similar special election occurred four years ago, but 55 percent of voters were against the sale of alcohol.

The Barbourville City Council and Alcoholic Beverage Control will now decide when sales will be allowed.

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Man wanted in 3 counties stopped by flood barricade

PADUCAH (AP) — A flooded road in McCraken County aided in the arrest of a man wanted in three counties after he got stuck attempting to drive around a barricade.

McCracken deputies told WPSD-TV Jacob Bailey gave them a false name and date of birth after he got stuck Thursday morning. But deputies realized his SUV was reported stolen in Nashville, Tennessee.

Deputies say they found illicit drugs, paraphernalia and prescription medications as well as a license plate stolen from a Marshall County residence.

Bailey was arrested on multiple charges including receiving stolen property, possession of a controlled substance and operating on a suspended license.

Bailey also was served with unrelated warrants from Marshall County, Graves County and McCracken County.

Bailey was jailed in the McCracken County Regional Jail.

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Shorter Illinois highway emerges from failed interstate bid

ST. LOUIS (AP) — A long-planned federal highway across southern Illinois connecting Cape Girardeau, Missouri to Paducah, Kentucky is no more — for now.

Federal transportation officials quietly pulled the plug on the 66 Corridor project over the summer after Kentucky withdrew its support for what was once envisioned as a coast-to-coast interstate that would invoke the iconic cross-country Route 66.

The Illinois Department of Transportation and its federal counterpart instead unveiled a proposed Shawnee Parkway in late November that would skirt portions of the national forest with the same name.

Local and regional boosters cite its economic development potential. Project opponents call it a waste of money with potentially dire environmental consequences.

A $1.5 million combined federal and state grant has been set aside for initial engineering and environmental studies.

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Some flooding in Ky., Tenn. as agencies try to control water

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) — Western Tennessee and Kentucky are still facing flood threats as the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and Tennessee Valley Authority work to control water levels.

The National Weather Service issued a flood advisory for the Cumberland River at Dover through Monday evening. The river was expected to rise to near 66.6 feet. Flood stage is 67 feet.

Minor flooding along the Ohio River was affecting parts of Owensboro and Paducah in Kentucky, with most cresting expected by Tuesday. Moderate flooding was reported along the Green River near Paradise, Kentucky.

The Mississippi River was expected to crest in Memphis at 41 feet on Jan. 8. Flood stage is 34 feet. Although no major flooding was expected in the city, officials were moving to protect roads and a local airport.

The city said it will close a portion of North Second Street to through traffic on Monday as crews install temporary barriers along the street to hold back floodwater north of downtown.

And workers will be filling sandbags to protect the nearby General DeWitt Spain Airport, which flooded in 2011 when a temporary levee along North Second failed. Some plane owners have moved their airplanes to other sites as a precaution.

Along the Downtown riverfront, the expected high water will force the relocation of several transformers in Tom Lee Park and some electrical equipment at one of the Beale Street Landing islands.

In Wickliffe, Kentucky, also on the Mississippi, residents were filling sandbags to protect local homes from the river.

In Finley, farmers along the Mississippi were evacuating homes and moving equipment to higher ground. The sheriff’s office placed deputies in the area and planned increased patrols to protect property there.

Janie Smith and her granddaughter Amanda began packing their home early Wednesday morning.

“If the water makes it up to my house this year that will be twice since 2011 that it’s got me,” Smith said. “Back in 2011, there was 4 inches of water in my house. I have another home in Dyersburg. We plan on going there until the water goes back down, but I’m hoping that it won’t make it this far.”

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Ky. malls impose chaperone rules after disturbance

LOUISVILLE (AP) — Two malls in Kentucky have imposed new chaperone rules following a weekend disturbance involving unruly teens.

The Courier-Journal reports new restrictions at Mall St. Matthews and Oxmoor Center will require adult supervision of anyone under the age of 18 during certain weekend hours.

General Manager of Mall St. Matthews David Jacoby announced the Parental Guidance Required program Wednesday. The program will require chaperones after 4 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays beginning Jan. 2. Jacoby says the program is temporary but he didn’t mention an end date.

The new rules follow an incident involving reports of fights, harassment of customers and store employees and other problems at Mall St. Matthews on Saturday.

The disturbance forced officials to close the mall Saturday. It was reopened Sunday with extra security.

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Fort Campbell to hold ceremony for new commander

FORT CAMBPELL (AP) — Fort Campbell is planning a ceremony to welcome its new commander, Brig. Gen. Scott E. Brower.

A statement from the Army post that straddles the Kentucky-Tennessee border says an Honor Eagle Ceremony for Brower will be held on Tuesday outside McAuliffe Hall.

The post says Brower will be the senior commander of Fort Campbell when about 500 soldiers with the 101st Airborne Division Headquarters deploy early next year to Iraq and Kuwait for nine months. The statement says the division headquarters will oversee coalition troops that are training and advising Iraqi security forces.

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Printing house for blind hoping to acquire rare Braille book

LOUISVILLE (AP) — The American Printing House for the Blind in Clifton is trying to raise $95,000 by Jan. 29 to buy one of only six know copies of Louis Braille’s 1829 book introducing the Braille system of reading and writing with raised dots.

The Courier-Journal reports the book’s title translated from the French is “Method for Writing Words, Music and Plainsong in Dots,” and it is one of only two copies in the United States.

Company spokeswoman Roberta Williams said if the printing house acquires it for its museum, it be the only copy on public display.

Williams described the book as being in “incredible condition” and said its “beautiful blue marbled paper cover is bright.” She said the 37 embossed pages are “clean and intact” and illustrate the experimental nature of early embossing using wooden blocks pressed onto wet paper.

The “Method” book is the first by blind Frenchman Braille, the teacher whose name became synonymous with the system of raised dots that are read by touch. Williams said Braille got the idea for the writing system in 1821 from a soldier. Braille organized and simplified the concept and published his elegant code system, which is still used around the world.

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