Law for a lifetime


By Kelsey Gerhardt - [email protected]



Kelsey Gerhardt|Daily News Robin Venable has spent a lifetime in law enforcement and currently works as a deputy for the Bell County Sheriffs Office.


Bell County Sheriff Deputy Robin Venable has an interesting work history and a unique career beginning to match.

At age 9, Venable was pulled over for riding a motorcycle without a license. He was given a ticket and it changed his life forever.

“Of course, they stopped me and made me push it home. I’ll never forget that. I even think my mother still has the ticket,” laughed Venable.

He remembers being embarrassed and ashamed, but being treated fairly by law enforcement.

“I mean, we had woods where we could ride, but what kid didn’t want to ride out on the road? Well, I did and I got caught and I remember my mom giving me the ‘I told you so’ speech,” said Venable.

After his positive experience with law enforcement, Venable decided this was what he wanted to do for the rest of his life.

Venable’s career started in 1988 with the Middlesboro Police Department as a patrolman. He went through the ranks as a sergeant and lieutenant. He left MPD during his 20th year for a job with the Fayette County Sheriffs Department where he worked for an additional two years.

“Each agency has been really different and it was kind of a culture shock working in the city for so long and then moving to a sheriffs department because of the kind of responsibilities and the changes you have to make,” said Venable.

He retired, but soon went back to work for the next three years as campus security at Transylvania University. Venable moved back to Bell County with the intent to move to Florida, but instead answered a call from Sheriff Mitch Williams and has spent the past nine months as a deputy with the Bell County Sheriff’s Office.

“I’m glad to be back. This is home and it will always be home and I really enjoy helping, servicing people here,” said Venable.

Venable’s most influential, memorable cases involve children and elderly people. He feels that they need the most help and should be dealt with accordingly.

“Whenever I’m speaking with an older person or a child, I fell like maybe I give them extra attention or assistance. They’re more vulnerable and I want them to know I’m there when they need it,” said Venable.

Venable is a Middlesboro High School graduate of 1984. He lives in Middlesboro where he enjoys running on the fitness trail and watching Kentucky and Auburn football.

Venable has two children — Erica, who will graduate from the nursing program at LMU in May and Bradley, a veterinarian in the Atlanta, Georgia area.

Reach Kelsey Gerhardt at 606-302-9093 or on Twitter @kgerhardmbdn.

Kelsey Gerhardt|Daily News Robin Venable has spent a lifetime in law enforcement and currently works as a deputy for the Bell County Sheriffs Office.
http://harlandaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/web1_venablebadge.jpgKelsey Gerhardt|Daily News Robin Venable has spent a lifetime in law enforcement and currently works as a deputy for the Bell County Sheriffs Office.

By Kelsey Gerhardt

[email protected]

comments powered by Disqus