Music to their ears


By Kelsey Gerhardt - [email protected]



Kelsey Gerhardt|Daily News Joshua, Noah and Daniel Smith are young musicians at Wilderness Road State Park in Ewing. The brothers play fiddle at Martins Station during events and bring sound to life in the 18th century.


A trio comprised of three young musicians brings another aspect to events at Wilderness Road State Park. The Smith brothers — Joshua, 14 Daniel, 12 and Noah, 12 — are fiddlers at Martins Station.

Together, they learned to play classical fiddle about seven years ago. They have since learned to play colonial music by ear and by reading from an 18th century music book they purchased at historic Williamsburg.

“We feel like God has given us a talent and Wilderness Road has been a good way to share it. We’re happy we have something we can share with people,” Joshua.

The brothers enjoy learning new things and are like sponges when it comes to new music. They can listen to a recording or CD of music and practice until they get it just right before sharing their new song with listeners.

“It takes a lot of concentration especially on the fast songs. I’ve learned about synchronizing with my brothers and that’s something that took a lot of getting used to,” said Noah.

The Smith brothers don’t just play music, but they want their listeners to feel the music they’re playing and have worked to make that apparent to visitors at Martins Station.

“My favorite part about playing music for classical violin is you can express your feelings through your music. With fiddle, it’s just really fun and you can add in dynamics that kind of help make it sound better,” said Daniel.

The boys practice 30 minutes every day and appreciate the teamwork music has taught them. They are homeschooled and enjoy Latin language classes, filmmaking and history — which is why they like participating in the reenactments at Martins Station.

“It means a lot to me to take part in the story of our nation, especially this time period when our nation was under attack by Indians and England. It’s important that the next generation know about the 1700s and why it’s so important,” said Daniel.

During the summer, the brothers can also be found playing at Cumberland Gap National Historical Park, Sycamore Shoals State Historic Area in Elizabethton, Tennessee and area churches, funerals and community events.

For now, they boys don’t have future plans but to continue their education and keep contributing to the story at WRSP.

“Well, for the future I hope to always play music together, but we don’t know what careers we’ll be having yet. We just like to tell the story of Wilderness Road settlement,” said Daniel.

Reach Kelsey Gerhardt at 606-248-1010.

Kelsey Gerhardt|Daily News Joshua, Noah and Daniel Smith are young musicians at Wilderness Road State Park in Ewing. The brothers play fiddle at Martins Station during events and bring sound to life in the 18th century.
http://harlandaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/web1_Smith.jpgKelsey Gerhardt|Daily News Joshua, Noah and Daniel Smith are young musicians at Wilderness Road State Park in Ewing. The brothers play fiddle at Martins Station during events and bring sound to life in the 18th century.

By Kelsey Gerhardt

[email protected]

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