Hospital upgrades surgical technology


Special to Civitas Media



Courtsey photo The Harlan ARH Hospital surgery team with the new high-resolution manometry unit are, from left: Pheby Evans, ORT; Regina Bruce, RN; Jerry Blevins, RN, clinical nurse manager; Kimberly Asher, CORT; Judy Klumper, Sandhill nurse educator; Jameel Butt, MD, general surgeon and hospital chief of staff.


While esophageal /anorectal manometry has been an established medical service locally for over 10 years, Harlan ARH Hospital recently invested in an advanced high resolution technology system to improve the quality of care to patients receiving this service.

The hospital’s surgical staff began using a High Resolution Impedence Manometry system from Sandhill Scientific in late September.

The benefits of this new technology to patients are faster and more comfortable exams that generate better quality data and more accurate studies for their medical providers. The equipment performs more comprehensive tests, giving detailed measurements of pressure along the digestive tract as food enters and leaves it. An added benefit to patients is that sedation is not required for these tests.

“The speed and accuracy of this new high-technology equipment means it can be very easily tolerated by our patients,” said Jameel Butt, MD, general surgeon and the hospital’s chief of staff.

One of the most important developments with this technology is the increase in clinical detail, which allows physicians to classify diseases and conditions in the digestive tract more accurately and thus more reliably remove a patient’s normal condition from consideration as a possible medical problem.

“From the patient’s standpoint, reducing the procedure time by 10 to 20 minutes is a great benefit,” Dr. Butt added. “This system is much more patient-friendly, as well as staff-friendly, than conventional manometry has been.”

Manometry is a commonly used technique to diagnose and treat heartburn and acid reflux disease, as well as gastric and bowel disorders. It is a non-invasive technique that uses a probe to measure the ph levels in the stomach and test the strength of the sphincter muscles that can control both reflux and incontinence.

This equipment is standard for use in the diagnosis and treatment of esophagitis, which can be caused by damage from acid reflux. Constant heartburn, hiatal hernia and bowel problems.

The specific tests include:

1. Esophageal Motility Study — to evaluate the function of the esophagus and identify the causes for swallowing difficulty and non-cardiac chest pain.

2. Reflux Study — GERD test to count the number of reflux episodes, the patient’s exposure to reflux, and to correlate their symptoms to reflux episodes.

3. Anorectal Manometry Study — to evaluate the function of the rectum and identify causes for pain, incontinence and defecation problems.

Courtsey photo The Harlan ARH Hospital surgery team with the new high-resolution manometry unit are, from left: Pheby Evans, ORT; Regina Bruce, RN; Jerry Blevins, RN, clinical nurse manager; Kimberly Asher, CORT; Judy Klumper, Sandhill nurse educator; Jameel Butt, MD, general surgeon and hospital chief of staff.
http://harlandaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/web1_Manometry-Team.jpgCourtsey photo The Harlan ARH Hospital surgery team with the new high-resolution manometry unit are, from left: Pheby Evans, ORT; Regina Bruce, RN; Jerry Blevins, RN, clinical nurse manager; Kimberly Asher, CORT; Judy Klumper, Sandhill nurse educator; Jameel Butt, MD, general surgeon and hospital chief of staff.

Special to Civitas Media

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