All posts by Harlan Daily Enterprise

IDA approves rent reduction for tenant

Authority hopes drop will stop layoffs

First Posted: 4:41 pm - May 26th, 2016 Updated: 4:43 pm - May 26th, 2016.

By Joe P. Asher - [email protected]



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The Harlan County Industrial Development Authority voted to cut the rent of a Lynch business in half in an attempt to help avoid layoffs.

Authority Chairman Harry Gibson explained to the panel the cut is needed to keep jobs at Hurberries, Inc.

“Each month since I’ve been here… Hurberries has religiously paid the obligation on the park up at Lynch, that being $4,000 per month,” Gibson said. “When it came up this month, (they) called and wanted to meet with me.”

Gibson said he met with a representative of the company, who explained the request for a reduction in rent.

“This business is tied into the coal business, and everybody knows where that’s at,” Gibson said.

According to Gibson, the business is operating in the red, and would probably require a reduction in the work force at Lynch.

Gibson said other options were discussed.

“We sat down and came to the idea if they could get the rent lowered from $4,000 per month to $2,000 a month, they could make it through without having to lay off anybody,” Gibson said. “I think the jobs and those people’s employment is more valuable to this county than the $2,000 a month is to the IDA.”

Gibson said the company has paid the rent without fail.

“I personally feel we can live with a reduction in rent a lot better than somebody can live with losing their job,” Gibson said. “If we have to make a choice, that’s what I suggest.”

Gibson suggested dropping the rent for a period of six months, then returning to the original rate.

“This has happened before,” Gibson said. “If we don’t work with them, and if (Hurberries) were to pull out, not only would we lose the entire rent, but we would also be stuck with the loss of jobs and we would have to secure the building. I believe we should consider working with these people.”

Authority member Clark Bailey made a motion to lower the rent on the Hurberries property to $2,000 until January. The motion passed with no opposition.

Reach Joe P. Asher at 606-909-4132 or on Twitter @joe_hde.

Authority hopes drop will stop layoffs

By Joe P. Asher

[email protected]

County school board approves non-resident contract with city

First Posted: 4:05 pm - May 26th, 2016 Updated: 4:49 pm - May 26th, 2016.

By Mark Bell - For the Enterprise



Photos submitted Harlan County High School’s Community Problem-Solving Team was recognized at the meeting. The team will be traveling with their staff sponsor, Virginia Rice, to Michigan in June for an international competition.
Julia Lashawn Gabbard was honored by the Harlan County Board of Education for her work to promote the district and celebrate the successes of public education with a banner displayed at the Kentucky School Boards Association annual conference at the Galt House in Louisville. The theme for the banner was “From Chalkboards to Whiteboards: Celebrating 8 Decades of Service.” KSBA has been providing resources to school districts across the state for 80 years. Superintendent Mike Howard presented Gabbard with the “Superintendent’s Teamwork Award” and commended her for her design and art talents.
Veterans Johnny Mack Johnson and Wallace Prince were awarded degrees at a recent Harlan County Board of Education meeting. Also pictured is Superintendent Mike Howard.
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The Harlan County School System has agreed to contract terms with the Harlan Independent School District regarding the enrollment and funding of non-resident students for the next two years.

The proposed contract was approved by the Harlan County Board of Education during a recent regular meeting.

Under the new agreement, both districts are authorized to enroll up to 195 students residing in the other district next year and up to 185 the following year, after which the contract comes up for renewal again. Those limits, however, are qualified by several conditions evidenced by current numbers.

According to county school officials, as of the end of the 2015-16 school year, a total of 284 county residents attended the city school district, with 61 city residents going to county schools.

The new agreement allows each district to enroll the siblings of their non-resident students as well as the children of full-time employees, none of whom will be counted against the maximum allowable number of non-resident students.

In addition, both districts may accept up to 25 tuition-paying non-resident students each year beyond the enrollment limit with each district limited to collecting no more than $1,500 per student per year.

Lastly, the superintendents are allowed by mutual agreement to address “extenuating circumstances (that) may occur in which a student may benefit from a change of enrollment to the other district.” These students would not be required to pay tuition and also would not count against the established limit.

State law requires public school districts to enter into these types of contracts in order to receive state and federal funding. Otherwise, the state board of education or court system would impose terms and allocate the funding at their discretion.

The county school board also approved their tentative budget for the coming year, which is built around general fund expectations of just over $5 million in local revenue and nearly $19.2 million in state revenue.

Other funds restricted to state and federal programs like food service, special education and debt service on the district’s bonds total another $8 million.

Superintendent Mike Howard told the board his expectations were the state would increase their allotment through the SEEK formula due to the district’s improvement in average daily attendance from the prior year.

Also, he said, the financial condition of the district had improved since January so planned expense cuts of nearly $600,000 would not be needed and the school system would finish the year easily meeting the two-percent-of-budget contingency fund required by the state.

The board agreed to participate in a matching fund provided by Kentucky Utilities that would fund an energy savings project to replace all the lighting in the gymnasiums at the high school and James A. Cawood elementary with more efficient LED technology.

The project will require a total of $30,000 from the district and will be carried out in two phases. The dollars for this project will come from energy savings already realized by the district from other projects during the year, Howard said.

The board also agreed to renew their insurance coverage for commercial liability and property with Wright Specialty Insurance in the amount of $353,000. Howard said the district was “lucky to get it. It’s a very fair quote.”

Board members briefly discussed and approved purchasing new trucks from a Louisville dealer. Three vehicles will be added to the maintenance fleet replacing models that are 12 years old or older. Howard said no local bids were received and that the district would need a couple more similar vehicles next year for the transportation department.

Their plan, Howard said, is to replace these types of vehicles a few at a time to prevent a large expense in any single year and to keep maintenance costs for them down.

In other action, the board:

• Awarded diplomas to veterans Johnny Mack Johnson and Wallace Prince;

• Heard a report of $1.7 million in scholarships that were awarded to local students during the high school’s recent Scholarship Night event;

• Presented high school art student Julia Gabbard with the Superintendent’s Teamwork Award for a banner she created and displayed by the Kentucky School Boards Association;

• Accepted the report of a food service review by the Kentucky Department of Agriculture for the district office and James A. Cawood Elementary School;

• Heard the superintendent’s employment report of seven certified retirements and 17 layoffs associated with coaching positions that would be refilled the following year, along with one classified termination;

• Recognized five students for their achievements as the high school’s Community Problem-Solving Team who will be traveling with their staff sponsor, Virginia Rice, to Michigan in June for an international competition;

• Approved payment of claims totaling $473,722.08;

• Approved the monthly financial report;

• Approved an agreement to accept student teaching placements and field placements from Midway University;

• Approved a procurement plan for School Food Services for 2016-17;

• Approved payment for school food service employees food handlers permits;

• Agreed to advertise for bids for food service equipment;

• Agreed to advertise for bids for prepared and delivered pizza to all schools;

• Approved the use of excess FSPK funds for purchase of greenhouse for the high school agriculture program;

• Declared as surplus old school buses, pickup trucks and van, and accept sealed bids for their disposal;

• Declared food service office equipment as surplus with no monetary value;

• Approved classified and certified job descriptions for 2016-17;

• Approved the substitute teaching list for 2016-17;

• Agreed to advertise for bids for transportation department vehicles;

• Agreed to advertise for bids for the maintenance supplies and materials;

• Declared old Cumberland elementary clocks as surplus with no monetary value and approved disposal;

• Approved the purchase of scoreboards for elementary/middle schools for baseball, soccer, softball and football;

• Approved a request for the high school Talent Search program to visit Carson Newman University on May 30 and June 3, to Harrogate on July 3, and to New York City via charter bus on July 8;

• Approved a 240-day agriculture teacher position at the high school at an approximate cost of $60,000;

• Approved 2016-7 certified salary schedules;

• Approved 2016-17 classified salary schedule;

• Approved the 2016-17 extra service pay scale;

• Approved the 2016-17 substitute salary scale;

• Renewed the service contract with Dayspring Counseling;

• Approved participation in the Elgin Foundation dental program;

• Approved the 2016-17 staffing allocation;

• Agreed to the settlement terms of a civil case involving the contractors and architect of the high school project;

• Held a brief executive session to discuss pending litigation.

Photos submitted Harlan County High School’s Community Problem-Solving Team was recognized at the meeting. The team will be traveling with their staff sponsor, Virginia Rice, to Michigan in June for an international competition.
http://harlandaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_Problem-Solvers-1.jpgPhotos submitted Harlan County High School’s Community Problem-Solving Team was recognized at the meeting. The team will be traveling with their staff sponsor, Virginia Rice, to Michigan in June for an international competition.

Julia Lashawn Gabbard was honored by the Harlan County Board of Education for her work to promote the district and celebrate the successes of public education with a banner displayed at the Kentucky School Boards Association annual conference at the Galt House in Louisville. The theme for the banner was “From Chalkboards to Whiteboards: Celebrating 8 Decades of Service.” KSBA has been providing resources to school districts across the state for 80 years. Superintendent Mike Howard presented Gabbard with the “Superintendent’s Teamwork Award” and commended her for her design and art talents.
http://harlandaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_Banner-1.jpgJulia Lashawn Gabbard was honored by the Harlan County Board of Education for her work to promote the district and celebrate the successes of public education with a banner displayed at the Kentucky School Boards Association annual conference at the Galt House in Louisville. The theme for the banner was “From Chalkboards to Whiteboards: Celebrating 8 Decades of Service.” KSBA has been providing resources to school districts across the state for 80 years. Superintendent Mike Howard presented Gabbard with the “Superintendent’s Teamwork Award” and commended her for her design and art talents.

Veterans Johnny Mack Johnson and Wallace Prince were awarded degrees at a recent Harlan County Board of Education meeting. Also pictured is Superintendent Mike Howard.
http://harlandaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_Vets-1.jpgVeterans Johnny Mack Johnson and Wallace Prince were awarded degrees at a recent Harlan County Board of Education meeting. Also pictured is Superintendent Mike Howard.

By Mark Bell

For the Enterprise

Crash sends 2 to hospital

First Posted: 4:05 pm - May 26th, 2016

Photos by Joe P. Asher A three vehicle collision resulted in two people being transported to Harlan ARH Hospital on Thursday. According to Kentucky State Police Trooper Mike Cornett, Robert Collier, of Lynch, was operating a four-door gray Kia Optima traveling southbound on U.S. 119 and collided with a commercial truck traveling northbound. Johnny Saylor, of Loyall, was driving a black Chevrolet Malibu travelling southbound behind Collier. Saylor lost control attempting to avoid the collision and struck a rock embankment. Justin Meek, driver of the commercial vehicle, was not injured. Kentucky State Police and Lifecare Ambulance Service responded to the scene.
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Photos by Joe P. Asher

A three vehicle collision resulted in two people being transported to Harlan ARH Hospital on Thursday. According to Kentucky State Police Trooper Mike Cornett, Robert Collier, of Lynch, was operating a four-door gray Kia Optima traveling southbound on U.S. 119 and collided with a commercial truck traveling northbound. Johnny Saylor, of Loyall, was driving a black Chevrolet Malibu travelling southbound behind Collier. Saylor lost control attempting to avoid the collision and struck a rock embankment. Justin Meek, driver of the commercial vehicle, was not injured. Kentucky State Police and Lifecare Ambulance Service responded to the scene.

Photos by Joe P. Asher A three vehicle collision resulted in two people being transported to Harlan ARH Hospital on Thursday. According to Kentucky State Police Trooper Mike Cornett, Robert Collier, of Lynch, was operating a four-door gray Kia Optima traveling southbound on U.S. 119 and collided with a commercial truck traveling northbound. Johnny Saylor, of Loyall, was driving a black Chevrolet Malibu travelling southbound behind Collier. Saylor lost control attempting to avoid the collision and struck a rock embankment. Justin Meek, driver of the commercial vehicle, was not injured. Kentucky State Police and Lifecare Ambulance Service responded to the scene.
http://harlandaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_CarWreck.jpgPhotos by Joe P. Asher A three vehicle collision resulted in two people being transported to Harlan ARH Hospital on Thursday. According to Kentucky State Police Trooper Mike Cornett, Robert Collier, of Lynch, was operating a four-door gray Kia Optima traveling southbound on U.S. 119 and collided with a commercial truck traveling northbound. Johnny Saylor, of Loyall, was driving a black Chevrolet Malibu travelling southbound behind Collier. Saylor lost control attempting to avoid the collision and struck a rock embankment. Justin Meek, driver of the commercial vehicle, was not injured. Kentucky State Police and Lifecare Ambulance Service responded to the scene.

http://harlandaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_Wreck.jpg

Sanders accepts Ky. results, making Clinton the winner

First Posted: 3:37 pm - May 26th, 2016 Updated: 3:41 pm - May 26th, 2016.

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FRANKFORT (AP) — Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders has accepted Kentucky’s primary election results, moving front-runner Hillary Clinton one delegate closer to securing the nomination.

State officials reviewed election totals from electronic voting machines and absentee ballots on Tuesday at the request of Sanders’ campaign after he finished 1,911 votes behind Clinton in the state’s May 17 primary, or less than one half of 1 percent of the vote. But Thursday’s recanvassing did not change the results.

Afterward, Sanders announced he would not ask a judge for a recount. That means Hillary Clinton will pick up one more delegate from the Bluegrass state, leaving her 74 delegates shy of securing the nomination.

But Sanders has vowed to stay in the race.

“We are very pleased that we split the delegates in a state with a closed primary in which independents cannot vote and where Secretary Clinton defeated Barack Obama by 35 points in 2008,” Sanders said in a news release.

On the Republican side, Donald Trump picked up a handful of previously uncommitted delegates on Thursday in North Dakota to secure the Republican nomination. But Clinton and Sanders appear likely to drag their contest into the summer, with the next elections scheduled for the Virgin Islands on June 4 and Puerto Rico on June 5.

The final tally from Kentucky gives Clinton 28 delegates and Sanders 27. Clinton leads Sanders by 272 pledged delegates and enjoys a near 500 delegate advantage among superdelegates.

Sanders won nearly every coal-producing county in Kentucky, underscoring Clinton’s weakness in Appalachia after her comments that her policies would put a lot of coal miners and coal companies out of business. Clinton has said she was mistaken in her remarks and has since touted her plan to invest billions of dollars in economically depressed coal regions.

Clinton enjoyed the support of most of Kentucky’s Democratic leaders, including former Gov. Steve Beshear and Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes.

Grimes, Kentucky’s chief election officer, oversaw Thursday’s recanvass. Some Sanders supporters have criticized her for endorsing Clinton in the primary.

“I think most people realize when you are elected secretary of state, you take that partisanship hat off, you come here to work of the people of Kentucky,” she said.

Prosecutor: Pair plotted to steal slain ex-coal exec’s SUV

First Posted: 3:31 pm - May 26th, 2016

By John Raby - Associated Press



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CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) — Two suspects in the fatal shooting of a former coal chief executive in southern West Virginia were planning to steal his vehicle, a prosecutor said Thursday.

The body of Bennett Hatfield, 59, was found Monday at a cemetery where he had been visiting his wife’s gravesite near the Kentucky-West Virginia border the day before. His SUV was found nearby.

Anthony Arriaga, 20, of Delphos, Ohio, was arraigned on a first-degree murder charge Thursday in Mingo County Circuit Court. He was ordered held without bond pending a June 3 preliminary hearing.

Mingo County Prosecutor Teresa Maynard said that based on interviews with Arriaga and others, authorities believe Arriaga and Brandon Lee Fitzpatrick, 18, of Louisa, Kentucky, hatched a plot to steal a vehicle.

According to Maynard, the two saw Hatfield’s SUV at the Mountain View Memory Gardens cemetery in Maher and Fitzpatrick dropped off Arriaga, who had a gun given to him by Fitzpatrick.

Hatfield resigned in 2015 as president and CEO of Patriot Coal, a month before the company filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection for the second time. He was International Coal Group’s CEO when a 2006 explosion at the Sago Mine in northern West Virginia killed 12 miners.

Maynard said the random shooting led authorities to believe that Arriaga had no connection to Hatfield.

“They were just driving by,” Maynard told The Associated Press. “They wanted to hijack a car, they said. And that was just the nice one that they happened to drive by and see.”

She said Fitzpatrick intended to get Hatfield’s vehicle, but after Hatfield was shot, Fitzpatrick disappeared and left Hatfield’s vehicle behind. Authorities believe Arriaga was the shooter.

Authorities still aren’t sure why the two suspects were in the Williamson area, which is about 50 miles from Fitzpatrick’s hometown. Maynard said authorities still have to interview Fitzpatrick, who is charged with first-degree murder and conspiracy and was being held in the Kenton County, Kentucky, jail pending extradition proceedings.

Maynard said Arriaga has no connections to southern West Virginia and came to the state because he was childhood friends with another co-defendant, Ricky Peterson, 20, of Wayne. It was through Peterson’s friendship that Arriaga met Fitzpatrick, Maynard said.

Peterson is charged with being an accessory after the fact, obstructing and providing false information to an officer. Authorities said Peterson told a state trooper he had no knowledge about Arriaga or Hatfield’s death, but two others at Peterson’s residence told the trooper that Arriaga had been there and had spoken with Peterson.

Authorities believe Arriaga sneaked along a river bank next to the cemetery after the shooting on Sunday and asked some neighbors to take him to Wayne County, where Peterson lived. Mingo County Sheriff James Smith has said a man who drove Arriaga to Wayne County contacted authorities after hearing about Hatfield’s death. A state police team helped track Arriaga to Wayne County and eventually into Ohio.

Arriaga’s aunt, Yolanda Arriaga-Traylor of Gibsonburg, Ohio, told The Associated Press on Wednesday that the family is trying to make sense of the charge against her nephew.

“This isn’t in Anthony’s character to do this,” she said. “Anthony has never been in trouble.”

By John Raby

Associated Press

State News in Brief

First Posted: 3:20 pm - May 26th, 2016

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Police investigating child death, fire in eastern Ky.

BOONEVILLE (AP) — Kentucky State Police are investigating a fire and death of a 5year-old girl in eastern Kentucky.

Police identified the girl as Jordyn Herald of Booneville.

A news release from police said officers were called about the fire on Old Kentucky 11 in Owsley County around 2 a.m. EDT Wednesday and were told the child was unable to escape and might still be inside the residence.

Police say after the fire was extinguished, the home was searched and the child’s remains found.

An autopsy was planned.

The cause of the fire is under investigation.

Police said anyone who saw suspicious activity or has information should contact them.

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Graves Co. deputy unloading gun shoots teen

HICKORY (AP) — Kentucky State Police say a teenager in western Kentucky was accidentally shot by her stepfather, a Graves County deputy sheriff.

Investigators say Sgt. David Warner was at his home in Hickory after his Wednesday shift and was unloading an off-duty firearm when he accidentally discharged one round, striking his 17-year-old stepdaughter. She was standing nearby when she was hit.

The Paducah Sun reports the injuries were non-life-threatening and the teen was taken to a Paducah hospital where she was in stable condition.

State Police did not detail the injury the teen suffered.

Graves County Sheriff Dewayne Redmon requested that state police investigate the shooting, since it involved a member of his department.

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Officials concerned with Mercer-Boyle Jail overcrowding

DANVILLE (AP) — Officials say the Mercer-Boyle County Jail is at 170 percent capacity, making it one of the most overcrowded jails in Kentucky.

Boyle County Jailer Barry Harmon says the jail has a population of 327 inmates.

The Advocate Messenger reports the jail has a record number of female inmates, with 85. Harmon says it is the fourth-most overcrowded jail in the state. Nearby Lincoln County is at the top of that list at 204 percent capacity with 147 inmates.

Harmon says the rise in female inmates is a trend and he expects the number to increase.

Harmon was sharing the statistics before a fiscal court meeting in Boyle County on Tuesday. The numbers from the Department of Corrections say Kentucky has 22 jails that are at or above 137 percent capacity.

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Officer recovers sister’s stolen gun, catches felon

BOWLING GREEN (AP) — Authorities say a Bowling Green police officer who was apprehending a man found a handgun that had been stolen from his sister.

Citing an arrest citation, the Bowling Green Daily News reports Officer James Lewis ran the license plate of a car he didn’t recognize that was parked in his neighborhood early Monday.

Lewis found out that the car belonged to 47-year-old Scottie Day, who was a suspect in several thefts.

The officer spotted Day walking behind a nearby home. When Lewis approached, police say Day threw a hat to the ground. Inside the hat was the handgun that Lewis’ sister had had stolen from her vehicle.

Day was charged with possession of a handgun by a convicted felon, among other charges. It’s unclear whether he has an attorney.

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Julian Castro to speak at Wendell Ford dinner next month

FRANKFORT (AP) — U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julian Castro will be the featured speaker at the annual Wendell Ford dinner sponsored by the Kentucky Democratic Party.

The June 3 dinner at the Kentucky Exposition Center in Louisville is the official start of the Kentucky Democratic Convention, where party leaders will select delegates to the national convention this summer.

Castro is the former mayor of San Antonio. He was the keynote speaker for the 2012 Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, North Carolina.

Hillary Clinton, who leads Bernie Sanders for the Democratic presidential nomination, is considering Castro as a potential running mate in the fall.

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Lane closures upcoming on Clark Memorial Bridge

LOUISVILLE (AP) — Kentucky transportation officials are advising motorists of upcoming lane closures on the Clark Memorial Bridge connecting Louisville and Jeffersonville, Indiana.

The lane closures are due to a bridge inspection set to begin May 31.

Officials say one lane of traffic will be closed in the evenings from May 31 to June 3 and again from June 5-9. Closures will occur from 7 p.m. until 6 a.m. the next day.

Officials say some lane closures on Interstate 64 will be necessary for inspecting underneath the Kentucky approach to the bridge.

They say two lanes of I-64 West will be closed on June 8 from 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. the next day. Crews will move to I-64 East on June 9, when two lanes will be closed from 10 p.m. until 5 a.m.

Cumberland Gap National Historical Park kicks off a summer full of history

Nature and music with the melodies of ‘Wild Blue Yonder’

First Posted: 12:30 pm - May 26th, 2016

Special to Civitas Media



Courtesy of Fated Genes The summer season at Cumberland Gap is off to a lively start on Saturday with summer campfire program featuring Wild Blue Yonder.
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Cumberland Gap National Historical Park is known for its exciting schedule of free programs which highlight the area’s amazing history, wildlife and Appalachian music. On Saturday evenings during the summer, special weekly campfire programs are held at the park’s outdoor amphitheater located at the Wilderness Road Campground.

This year’s summer campfire program schedule will kick off on May 28 at 8 p.m. with the folk/Americana band Wild Blue Yonder.

This musical group, a regional favorite since 2001, has broken into the realm of “newgrass” with a roadkill anthem, two top-selling CD releases and airplay on more than 60 stations in the U.S. and abroad. Their performances have spanned the southern states including North Carolina, Kentucky, Georgia, Mississippi, Virginia and eastern Tennessee.

Music runs deep in the bloodlines of all four Wild Blue Yonder (WBY) members. WBY founders Melissa Wade and Philip Coward claim a rich musical heritage, starting with three of their great-uncles who played fiddle, guitar and banjo. Grandmother Sarah filled her humble home with primitive, a cappella versions of Appalachian hymns that resonate through her grandchildren’s voices even today.

Sisters Cindy Wallace and Laura Knight, who both contribute fiddle and a variety of percussion to the band, began performing with their family in North Carolina in their early teens. As the Wallace Sisters, they have graced many stages across the southeast, including Dollywood Theme Park and Music Mansion in Sevierville, Tennessee.

Every Wild Blue Yonder performance features plenty of high-energy fiddle tunes and well-known gospel favorites, along with healthy doses of humor and audience participation. Although they rarely get through a night without filling a request for the infamous “possum song,” the group shows they can write and deliver more than funny critter tunes with originals like “Sweet Summer Day” and “Bolt Out Of The Blue,” a song inspired by the Linville, North Carolina area.

“Appalachian Americana” is one stylistic label Wild Blue Yonder appreciates, as it conveys a respect for tradition combined with their progressive leanings. For anyone who might accidentally call them a bluegrass band, check out those congas, bongos and chimes, and the intricate chord progressions on their ninety-mile-an-hour “Dreams Coming True.” One reviewer described the band as “a tasty mix of Americana-flavored originals, old-time mountain tunes, and foot-stomping hoe-downs in folky harmony backed by spicy twin fiddles, smokin’ mandolin, groovy percussion, guitar and bass.”

The Wilderness Road Campground is located in Virginia, two miles east of the Hwy 25E and Hwy 58 intersection. Visitors should proceed to the amphitheater, located at the end of loop C where parking is available. In case of rain, the program will be held at the national park visitor center, located on Hwy 25E, just south of Middlesboro, Kentucky.

This event is made possible by generous funding and support from the Friends of Cumberland Gap National Historical Park www.friendsofcumberlandgap.org or www.facebook.com/friendsofcumberlandgap and park partner Eastern National www.easternnational.org.

For more information about Cumberland Gap National Historical Park, call 606-248-2817 or visit www.nps.gov/cuga.

Courtesy of Fated Genes The summer season at Cumberland Gap is off to a lively start on Saturday with summer campfire program featuring Wild Blue Yonder.
http://harlandaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_Wild-Blue-Yonder.jpgCourtesy of Fated Genes The summer season at Cumberland Gap is off to a lively start on Saturday with summer campfire program featuring Wild Blue Yonder.
Nature and music with the melodies of ‘Wild Blue Yonder’

Special to Civitas Media

Students participate in field day

First Posted: 11:53 am - May 26th, 2016

Photos submitted Harlan Elementary School closed the 2015-2016 school year by participating in field day. Students enjoyed many fun physical activities and were awarded ribbons in different events.
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Photos submitted

Harlan Elementary School closed the 2015-2016 school year by participating in field day. Students enjoyed many fun physical activities and were awarded ribbons in different events.

Photos submitted Harlan Elementary School closed the 2015-2016 school year by participating in field day. Students enjoyed many fun physical activities and were awarded ribbons in different events.
http://harlandaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_Field-Day.jpgPhotos submitted Harlan Elementary School closed the 2015-2016 school year by participating in field day. Students enjoyed many fun physical activities and were awarded ribbons in different events.

http://harlandaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_Field-Day-2.jpg

A Homestead Act for Appalachia

First Posted: 11:29 am - May 26th, 2016

By James Branscome - Guest Columnist



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Appalachia, especially its coal mining region, is experiencing a revived bit of attention as shuttered mines, a rise in income inequality and longstanding poverty received flashes of concern from both Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump.

As a native son of the region with many kin and friends unemployed by the decline in coal production, it might be logical to expect I should be optimistic that things are really going to change for the better in the mountains as a result of this latest regional revival. My experience as a journalist covering the War on Poverty and New Deal legacy institutions like the Tennessee Valley Authority, however, tempers my optimism.

After all, Clinton’s standard Democratic formulas of job retraining and federal aid that launched the 50-year old War on Poverty and the Appalachian Regional Commission have turned out to leave the region today in the same relative position to the nation that it was a half century ago: At the bottom of the poorest.

Trump’s vague proposals to make miners “proud” again and to somehow bring the continuous mining machines and Cat bulldozers back to life make me think he understands the business of coal mining no better than he knew the business of gambling in Atlantic City that bankrupted his casinos.

There is another way.

Anyone who has spent time in the mountains and hollows from Middlesboro,Kentucky, to Beckley, West Virginia, understands that most of the land is owned either by coal and timber companies or the federal government with its national forests and parks. Coal companies alone own 1.3 million acres in the Cumberlands of Kentucky and even more in the Alleghenies of West Virginia. The federal government is actually the largest single landowner in Appalachia.

With the region’s largest coal companies in bankruptcy or nearly so, I have an idea for Clinton and Trump: Let’s buy those bankrupted acres and let’s release some of those federal holdings. And then we can give the people something they have not had since industrialization and coal mining started in Appalachia in the 1880s — land. Land for farming, for gardens, for housing, for grazing cattle, horses and hogs, and for sustainable forestry.

Let’s call this the Appalachian Homestead Act, in homage to the federal initiative that helped settle the West and build wealth in the 19th century. The Appalachian Homestead Act may be today’s single best solution to the enduring problem of mountain poverty. And it may well be the most important opportunity for a new generation looking for a place to build an economy and a community that make sense in a time of global warming and economic dysfunction.

This is the perfect policy for both candidates. Trump could probably make some real deals negotiating with these bankrupt companies. Clinton might find favor in a region that has not looked kindly on her of late, trimming some federal holdings, swapping with others, all the while turning property back to mountain communities.

Now’s the time to act. Over a dozen mountain coal producers have entered bankruptcy in just the last few years. Alpha Natural Resources, the nation’s second largest producer, is bankrupt and owns 97,000 acres of West Virginia property and thousands of acres in its home state of Virginia. It’s a safe bet that the idled mines in the famous Elkhorn coal seams in Letcher and Pike counties in Kentucky that once fueled the furnaces of Bethlehem Steel and the Harlan County mines that did the same for U.S. Steel, International Harvester and Ford Motor Company will never see miner’s lamps again or hear their lunch buckets bang against mantrips and roof bolters.

The appalling drug addiction, alcoholism and suicide rates in the mountains are the most glaring testimony to mountaineers’ despair. People have become separated from the land and from hope. Despite that, mountain folks are easily those amongst us who know the most about independent living, with a work ethic by coal miners and long-distance commuters that put the lie to tales of Appalachian lethargy. All over the region there are very successful entrepreneurial enterprises, ranging from food co-ops to small manufacturers to 21st century businesses employing the fastest broadband.

What would people do with this new land? Besides producing food for themselves and nearby coastal cities, they could replant the region with blight-resistant chestnut trees that once fattened hogs to beyond bacon tasty and furnished fine homes with some of America’s most beautiful wood. They could reforest the ravaged strip mines with apple, peach, pear and cherry trees. They could create a recreational paradise with hiking and biking trails along restored rivers and creeks.

But among the best of these “restorations,” however, would be the restoration of hope. After all, the lack of money and hope is what combines to produce poverty. For Clinton the Appalachian Homestead Act could be the ultimate vindication of the idea that it “takes a village” to solve enduring problems. For Trump, buying land at historically low prices could be the deal of his lifetime. For Appalachian communities, this could be “the change we can really believe in.”

Mountaineers saved the American Revolution at the Battle of King’s Mountain in 1780. Let’s give them a chance to lead again.

Jim Branscome is a retired managing director of Standard & Poor’s and a former journalist whose articles have appeared in the Washington Post, the New York Times, Business Week, and The Mountain Eagle of Whitesburg, Kentucky. He was a staff member in 1969-71 at the Appalachian Regional Commission, a lobbyist for Save Our Kentucky in Frankfort and a staff member of the Appalachian Project at the Highlander Research and Education Center in New Market, Tennessee. He was born in Hillsville, Virginia and is a graduate of Berea College. Courtesy of Daily Yonder.

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By James Branscome

Guest Columnist

The case for limited government

First Posted: 11:27 am - May 26th, 2016

Lee H. Hamilton - Comments on Congress



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It has been 35 years since Ronald Reagan’s first inaugural speech as president — the one in which he said, “In this present crisis, government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem.” Over that time, hostility toward government seems only to have grown, led by politicians and embraced by millions of Americans.

I find this troubling. Not because those agencies — or the government as a whole — are faultless, but because I don’t see how a democratic society and market economy can function without an effective government.

In fact, I’d argue that limited government is more often part of the solution than it is a problem. It funds core functions — such as infrastructure, the court system, and national security — that allow the private sector to flourish. It sustains national parks, interstate highways, the air traffic control system and other services that make this a vibrant society. It strives to protect Americans from hazardous food and drugs, unsafe workplaces, and toxic polluters. It has played a key role in asserting fairness for minorities, women and the most vulnerable people in our society.

This is not to say that government does not overreach, or that it always performs as it should. On occasion, its leaders make poor and misguided decisions; its legislators, however well intentioned, create wasteful and unneeded programs.

But we’re not going to do away with government. Instead, we have to make the sometimes comfortable, sometimes uneasy co-existence of the market and the government work.

So it’s crucial for our political leaders to find the right balance. To establish in clear terms where government should and should not be active. To test what works and what does not and then pursue the former and shut down the latter. To wring duplication out of the bureaucracy and rigorously pursue efficient, effective, and accountable government. To ensure tough, fair enforcement of the law. And to recognize that their focus on policy needs to be balanced by a focus on effective management and implementation of programs.

As a politician, you can always get applause for quoting the old line, “That government is best which governs least.” But list what government does that affects people’s everyday lives, and you’ll see members of that same audience nod their heads in agreement. It’s the balance between limited government and the private sector that it’s our job constantly to assess, debate, and get right.

Lee Hamilton is a senior advisor for the Indiana University Center on Representative Government; a Distinguished Scholar, IU School of Global and International Studies; and a professor of practice, IU School of Public and Environmental Affairs. He was a member of the U.S. House of Representatives for 34 years.

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Lee H. Hamilton

Comments on Congress

Warm breeze of early summer

First Posted: 6:00 am - May 26th, 2016

Slim Randles - Home Country



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Steve looked out from the turret of his cabin and watched the sun set behind the mountain. Branding is over for the spring, and he was able to get away from the ranch for a few days, so here he was, in his private castle, sipping private coffee, looking down at his private horse eating hay in his private corral.

For a man who has spent most of his life in a bunkhouse, a suite at the Ritz couldn’t be more wonderful than this little hole-up spot in the mountains.

He slid open one of the turret windows and let the warm breeze of early summer caress his magnificent mustache.

“That does it!” he said.

He closed the window, climbed down the ladder and went out to saddle Ol’ Snort. In a few minutes the two of them were heading along a little trail near Thompson Ridge, feeling the warm breeze, wondering how many more of these evenings they would share. Steve and Snort were both getting years on them, but they have this evening. They have this ride. They are together now.

And it was like taking a dry bath in paradise.

Steve reached down and patted Snort on the neck. “You know, O.S.,” Steve said, “can you think of a luckier man/horse combination than us? I can’t. Not right at the moment, anyway.”

Snort was used to listening to Steve, but blissfully he wasn’t required to do anything but

walk along this mountain trail enjoying the evening.

“What do you think, old boy?”

Ol’ Snort reached his head out and blew his nose.

“I knew you felt the same way,” said Steve, smiling.

Sometimes heaven comes in small doses.

The Home Country radio show will be coming soon to a radio station near you! New, from Syndication Networks.

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Slim Randles

Home Country

Today in History

First Posted: 12:01 am - May 26th, 2016

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By the Associated Press

Today is Thursday, May 26, the 147th day of 2016. There are 219 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On May 26, 1521, Martin Luther was banned by the Edict of Worms (vohrms) because of his religious beliefs and writings.

On this date:

In 1868, the impeachment trial of President Andrew Johnson ended with his acquittal on the remaining charges.

In 1913, Actors’ Equity Association was organized by a group of actors at the Pabst Grand Circle Hotel in New York.

In 1938, the House Un-American Activities Committee was established by Congress.

In 1940, Operation Dynamo, the evacuation of some 338,000 Allied troops from Dunkirk, France, began during World War II.

In 1941, the American Flag House, where Betsy Ross once lived, was donated to the city of Philadelphia.

In 1954, explosions rocked the aircraft carrier USS Bennington off Rhode Island, killing 103 sailors. (The initial blast was blamed on leaking catapult fluid ignited by the flames of a jet.)

In 1960, U.N. Ambassador Henry Cabot Lodge accused the Soviets during a meeting of the Security Council of hiding a microphone inside a wood carving of the Great Seal of the United States that had been presented to the U.S. Embassy in Moscow.

In 1969, the Apollo 10 astronauts returned to Earth after a successful eight-day dress rehearsal for the first manned moon landing.

In 1971, Don McLean recorded his song “American Pie” at The Record Plant in New York City (it was released the following November by United Artists Records).

In 1972, President Richard M. Nixon and Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev signed the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty in Moscow. (The U.S. withdrew from the treaty in 2002.)

In 1981, 14 people were killed when a Marine jet crashed onto the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz off Florida.

In 1991, a Lauda Air Boeing 767 crashed in Thailand, killing all 223 people aboard.

Ten years ago: Air Force Gen. Michael Hayden won confirmation to be the 20th CIA director in a 78-15 Senate vote.

Five years ago: Congress passed a four-year extension of post-Sept. 11 powers contained in the Patriot Act to search records and conduct roving wiretaps in pursuit of terrorists; President Barack Obama, in France, signed the measure using an autopen machine minutes before the provisions were set to expire at midnight. Ratko Mladic (RAHT’-koh MLAH’-dich), the brutal Bosnian Serb general suspected of leading the massacre of 8,000 Muslim men and boys, was arrested after a 16-year manhunt. (Mladic was extradited to face trial in The Hague, Netherlands.)

One year ago: Challenging Hillary Rodham Clinton from the left, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders formally kicked off his Democratic presidential bid in Burlington, Vermont, with a pitch to liberals to join him in a “political revolution” to transform the nation’s economy and politics.

Today’s Birthdays: Actor Alec McCowen is 91. Sportscaster Brent Musberger is 77. Rock musician Garry Peterson (Guess Who) is 71. Singer Stevie Nicks is 68. Actress Pam Grier is 67. Actor Philip Michael Thomas is 67. Country singer Hank Williams Jr. is 67. British Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn is 67. Actress Margaret Colin is 59. Country singer-songwriter Dave Robbins is 57. Actor Doug Hutchison is 56. Actress Genie Francis is 54. Comedian Bobcat Goldthwait is 54. Singer-actor Lenny Kravitz is 52. Actress Helena Bonham Carter is 50. Distance runner Zola Budd is 50. Rock musician Phillip Rhodes is 48. Actor Joseph Fiennes (FYNZ) is 46. Singer Joey Kibble (Take 6) is 45. Actor-producer-writer Matt Stone is 45. Contemporary Christian musician Nathan Cochran is 38. Actress Elisabeth Harnois is 37. Actor Hrach Titizian is 37.

What’s Goin’ On

First Posted: 11:59 pm - May 25th, 2016

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To place an event in the “What’s Goin’ On” section, email: [email protected]; fax: 606-573-0042; or drop a written/typed copy of the announcement by our office at 1548 Hwy. 421 South (beside Hardee’s). Announcements will not be accepted by phone and should be submitted no later than four days before the event. If received in time, it will be published one or two days before the event. Announcements are also available to view at www.harlandaily.com. For more details, call 606-909-4145.

FRIDAY

Harlan ARH Hospital will present the LUNCH-N-LEARN Series at noon on May 27 at the hospital’s One West Conference Room. Kristal Burke, RN, will speak on safe delivery of healthy babies. There will be a free lunch and giveaways. For more information including a reservation, contact Mark Bell at 606-573-8208 or [email protected]

The Harlan County Extension Service is offering a JEWELRY MAKING CLASS, taught by Bonnie Schwab and Tina Chugg, at 4 p.m. on May 27 at the Harlan County Extension Depot. This is a design your own jewelry class and for the cost of $15 you may make one or several pieces. There will be lots of bead choices available. You must register by calling 606-573-4464.

TODAY-FRIDAY

The Harlan County BOOKMOBILE SCHEDULE for the week of May 23 include:

Thursday — Black Mountain, Brittains Creek and Dizney.

Friday — Eastbrook Station and High Rise Apartments.

SATURDAY

STORY TELLIN’ IN THE MOUNTAINS will be held at 6:30 p.m. on May 28 at the Harlan County Extension Depot. Join in for an evening of laughter and fun — stories and tall tales will be told by several tellers from the Kentucky Story Telling Association. Admission is free. Ice cream and drinks will be served. For more information, contact the Extension Office at 606-573-4464.

SUNDAY

The EMS Road Docs Kentucky Chapter will present a POKER RUN for Bella on May 29 at Wildcat Harley Davidson in London. The event is to raise awareness for autism and service dog for Bella. Registration is from 9-10:30 a.m. Last bike must be out by 11 a.m., and all bikes must be back by 3 p.m. The fee is $20, single rider; $25, double. Prizes will be awarded for best and worst hands. There will also be a bake sale, hot dog sale, drinks and a concert. A donation bucket will also be passed out on site — donation are not required, but greatly appreciated. All bikers welcome — no alcohol or drugs permitted. For more information, contact Jeromy Killion at 606-246-0982.

MAY 30-JUNE 2

Lewis Creek Pentecostal Church will host Vacation BIBLE SCHOOL from 6-8:15 p.m. May 30 through June 2. For transportation, contact Richie and Rhona at 606-589-5904, Linda at 606-633-1533 or Darlene at 606-589-0016.

MAY 31

The Harlan County Extension Service will kick-off the annual Poke Sallet Festival with an ICE CREAM SOCIAL from 5-7 p.m. on May 31 at the Harlan County Extension Depot. Ice cream with toppings and drinks will be served. Educational booths will be available and favors will be given. Everything is free. For more information, contact the Extension Office at 606-573-4464.

First Priority Network in Harlan County has been announced, and organizers will also be reaching out to Letcher and Leslie counties. A meeting will be held at 6 p.m. on May 31 at Pizza Hut. Principals, teaches, pastors, youth pastors and parents interested in participating with a club at your local school are encouraged to attend.

JUNE 1

The annual 4-H KIDS’ FUN DAY will be held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. as part of the Poke Sallet Festival

JUNE 2-4

The 61st annual POKE SALLET FESTIVAL will be held June 2-4 in downtown Harlan. For more information, visit pokesalletfestival.com.

The fifth annual U.S. 25 YARD SALE will be held June 2-4 along U.S. 25, U.S. 25E, U.S. 25W and U.S. 25/70 in Kentucky, Tennessee and North Carolina. For more information, visit www.facebook.com/U.S.25YARDSALE.

JUNE 2

The annual MISS HARLAN COUNTY Scholarship Pageant will begin at 6:30 p.m. on June 2 at Harlan County High School.

JUNE 4

New to this year’s Poke Sallet Festival is the 3 ON 3 BASKETBALL SHOOTOUT. Starting at 9 a.m. on June 4, at the Harlan High School gymnasium, the shootout teams may consist of four players ages 14 and up. The entry fee per team is $100. Winners will have bragging rights and an introduction on the Main Stage of the festival. There will be a $1 admission charge to watch the event. For more information, contact Paul Hearld at 606-273-6944.

JUNE 5-10

Loyall Church of Christ will host VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL from 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. June 6-10 for ages 5-12. There will be singing, Bible stories, lunch, games, crafts and lots of fun. Registration will be from 5-6:30 p.m. on June 5. For more information, call 606-573-5315.

JUNE 6-10

Wallins Baptist Church will host Vacation BIBLE SCHOOL, Submerged — Finding Truth Below the Surface, from 6-8:30 p.m. June 6-10. There will be Bible lessons, music, food, crafts, and recreation. For more information or for transportation, contact Buddy or Janet Howard at 606-664-3054.

Yocum Creek Baptist Church, located in Middleton Addition of Evarts, will host Vacation BIBLE SCHOOL, Ocean Commotion Noah’s Ark, from 6-8:05 p.m. June 6-10. There will be fun, food, games, science experiments, songs, Bible stories and more. For more information, call 606-837-2519. For transportation, call 606-837-8214.

The fourth annual REVIVAL at Martins Fork Lake will begin at 6:30 p.m. June 6-10 at the big shelter house. The scheduled includes: Monday, Spencer Burkhart; Tuesday, Charlie Napier; Wednesday and Thursday, Garry Ferguson; Friday, Charlie Napier. Everyone is welcome. For more information, call 606-573-6646.

JUNE 6

The Clover Fork NEIGHBORHOOD WATCH will meet at 6 p.m. on June 6 in the basement of Evarts Methodist Church, located next to the old high school, featuring the emergency management office. For more information, contact Pastor Mike Pitzer at 606-837-3228, David Cooper at 606-837-2363 or Preston McLain at 606-837-3546.

JUNE 9-10

The third annual SELLING TO THE WORLD EXPO, aspiring entrepreneurs and small business owners, will be held June 9 and 10 at Southeast Kentucky Community & Technical College’s Middlesboro campus. For more information, visit www.selling2theworld.com or email [email protected] or [email protected]

JUNE 14-17

Riverside Missionary Baptist Church will present BIBLE CAMP from 9-11:30 a.m. June 14-17 for K-4 through eighth-grade. For more information, call 606-573-2814 or 606-574-0004.

JUNE 20-24

The First Baptist Church of Loyall will host Vacation BIBLE SCHOOL from 6-8:30 p.m. June 20-24. This year’s theme is Egypt: Joseph’s Journey from Prison to Palace. Children in K4- through sixth-grade are invited to attend. There will be Bible lessons, crafts, snacks, singing and recreation time each night. For more information, contact the church office at 606-573-2710.

• • • • • • •

Harlan County Community Action Agency is sponsoring a SUMMER FOOD SERVICE Program. The program was established to ensure low income children continue to receive meals when school is not in session. Children 18 and under can receive meals through the S.F.S.P. CAA is sponsoring various sites, which are the actual locations where meals are served and children eat in a supervised setting. Eligible sites are those that serve children in low income areas or specific groups of low income children. This program is of no cost to sponsored site. Churches that host Vacation Bible School or Sunday School or other school organizations with children age 18 and under are encouraged to participate. For more information, contact Mistie Sanders at Harlan County Community Action Agency at 606-573-5335 ext. 233.

SHEPHERD’S PANTRY, located at 111 Union Street in Clutts, will be signing up new clients for the pantry (not commodities) program from 10-11 a.m. on the third and fourth Tuesday and third Wednesday of each month until further notice. You must bring proof of all earned and unearned income for every member of the household and their Social Security card as well as your utility bill with 911 address.

The American RED CROSS is seeking volunteers with flexible schedules to respond to single and multi-family home fires in the Lake Cumberland service area which includes Casey, Adair, Cumberland, Clinton, Russell, Pulaski, Wayne, McCreary, Whitley, Laurel, Clay, Knox, Bell and Harlan counties. Red Cross Disaster Action Team (DAT) volunteers respond to assist families with shelter, support and access to basic needs immediately following a home fire – often arriving on scene even as the fire is still burning. Volunteers may apply online by visiting http://www.redcross.org/volunteer or by contacting Chapter Executive Terry Burkhart at 859-253-1331 or [email protected]

Ann’s Food Pantry, a mission of the Harlan United Methodist Church, is in NEED OF DONATIONS for non-perishable food items. Monetary donations are also being accepted to provide foods such as meat, milk, bread, etc. For more information, contact the church at 606-573-1464; Kyle Burnett at 606-573-3866; or Wylene Miniard at 606-573-7731 (evenings).

The Harlan County band program is hosting an INSTRUMENT DRIVE. If you have instruments in your closet, garage or know someone who is looking to donate instruments, consider putting your instrument in the hands of a student who can use it today. You can drop your instrument off in the office at any Harlan County school or contact one of the band directors at 606-574-2020 ext. 3550 to make arrangement for pickup. If directors are in class, leave a voicemail with your name and phone number and you will be contacted as soon as possible.

The Harlan County Humane Society will have BINGO SESSIONS at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesdays and Fridays at the old Totz Bingo Hall. Proceeds benefiting the humane society.

Benchmark Family Services, serving Bell, Harlan, Clay, Knox, Laurel and Whitley counties, invites you to become a FOSTER PARENT. Free orientation classes are held from 5-6 p.m. on any Tuesday. For more information, call 606-526-6992 or toll free at 866-526-6992.

AWANA meetings at Yocum Creek Missionary Baptist Church, located in Middleton Addition in Evarts, are held from 6:30-8 p.m. on Wednesdays — with classes for K-4 through high school. Participants can earn T-shirts and prizes. There will be games, Bible lessons, food, fun and more. For bus pick up, call 606-837-3170 or 606-837-8214.

The JOB CLUBS of Eastern Kentucky meets weekly with a small group of job seekers and workforce professionals to gain a competitive edge in today’s tough job market. Job clubs are free and help you create a game plan for your job search link with quality employers, improve your interviewing skills, learn self-marketing skills, evaluate, negotiate and land job offers, connect with other job seekers and ease your stress during your job search. The Harlan County Job Club will meet at 1 p.m. on Wednesdays at the Depot in Harlan. New members are welcome. New member orientation begins at 12:30 p.m.

Free saliva-based drug testing kits are provided and sponsored through UNITE and Stand in the Gap Coalition (SIGCO). Give Me a Reason (GMAR) is designed for parents/guardians to use to talk with their children and randomly test them, which gives them a reason to say no when tempted or offered drugs. Kits can be obtained at 44 different distribution points (DP) throughout the Tri-State area and at the SIGCO office, located at 502 Pennlyn Avenue in Cumberland Gap, Tennessee. For more information, contact the SIGCO office at 423-300-1302. To pick up a kit, stop by on Thursdays from noon to 5:30 p.m. Join prayer at the SIGCO office from 5-6 p.m. on the first Tuesday of each month.

GED classes are being offered to anyone 19 years or older. Improve your reading, writing and mathematical skills and study to receive your GED. Follow your children by improving your education free of charge. For more information, contact the following locations: Southeast Kentucky Community & Technical College Middlesboro campus at 606-248-3175, Middlesboro Learning Center at 606-248-4000, Pineville Learning Center at 606-337-3044, Henderson Settlement at 606-337-7729 ext. 305 or Lighthouse Mission at 606-337-1069.

VOLUNTEERS and friendly visitors are needed for the Kentucky Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program to enrich the lives of seniors in their long-term care facilities. If you currently visit with someone or would like to become more involved and educated on resident’s rights, elder abuse and long-term care for seniors, contact Arlene Gibson, district ombudsman with Cumberland Valley ADD, at 606-864-7391 ext. 119.

A military SUPPORT GROUP for all active, separated or any former military men or women meets at 6:30 p.m. every first and third Monday of the month at the Middlesboro National Guard Armory, located on 30th Street. If you are facing financial, relationship, criminal, adjustment, substance abuse or other problems, this is for you.

Narconon is reminding families that the use of addicting drugs is on the rise. Take steps to PROTECT YOUR FAMILY FROM DRUG USE. If you know anyone who is struggling get them the help they need. For a free brochure on the signs of addiction for all drugs, call 800-431-1754 or visit DrugAbuseSolution.com. Narconon also offers free screenings and referrals.

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District champs

First Posted: 11:35 pm - May 25th, 2016 Updated: 7:27 pm - May 26th, 2016.

Kim Henson | Daily Enterprise Harlan County avenged a loss in last year’s district finals by defeating Middlesboro 6-2 on Wednesday at Bell County High School to capture the 52nd District Tournament championship. The Lady Bears are pictured with the championship trophy after the game. Both teams advance to the 13th Region Tournament next week at Knox Central.
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Kim Henson | Daily Enterprise

Harlan County avenged a loss in last year’s district finals by defeating Middlesboro 6-2 on Wednesday at Bell County High School to capture the 52nd District Tournament championship. The Lady Bears are pictured with the championship trophy after the game. Both teams advance to the 13th Region Tournament next week at Knox Central.

Kim Henson | Daily Enterprise Harlan County avenged a loss in last year’s district finals by defeating Middlesboro 6-2 on Wednesday at Bell County High School to capture the 52nd District Tournament championship. The Lady Bears are pictured with the championship trophy after the game. Both teams advance to the 13th Region Tournament next week at Knox Central.
http://harlandaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_1-KH-HCHS-district-champs.jpgKim Henson | Daily Enterprise Harlan County avenged a loss in last year’s district finals by defeating Middlesboro 6-2 on Wednesday at Bell County High School to capture the 52nd District Tournament championship. The Lady Bears are pictured with the championship trophy after the game. Both teams advance to the 13th Region Tournament next week at Knox Central.

Lady Bears break through

HCHS downs Middlesboro in district finals

First Posted: 11:20 pm - May 25th, 2016 Updated: 7:08 pm - May 26th, 2016.

By John Henson - [email protected]



Photos by Anthony Cloud | Daily News Lainey Cox caught a fly ball in right field during Wednesday’s victory over Middlesboro.
Madison Shields threw a runner out at first during Wednesday’s district championship game.
Kim Henson | Daily Enterprise Destinee Jenkins delivered a pitch in the 52nd District Tournament championship game Wednesday. Jenkins was the winning pitcher and added a double to earn tournament most valuable player honors in the Lady Bears’ 6-2 win over Middlesboro.
Kim Henson | Daily Enterprise Harlan County third baseman Farren Clark connected on a pitch during the fifth inning of Wednesday’s 52nd District Tournament championship game. Clark’s blast turned into a two-run inside-the-park homer to spark the Lady Bears in a 6-2 win over Middlesboro.
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LOG MOUNTAIN — Harlan County coach Tim McElyea had the look of a man who had just dropped a 500-pound gorilla off his back as his Lady Bears celebrated around him following a 6-2 win Wednesday over Middlesboro in the 52nd District Tournament finals at Bell County.

“They’ve had our number a long time,” said McElyea of a Middlesboro team that beat the Lady Bears three times this season and in last year’s 52nd District Tournament finals. “It was a good win. Our defense came to play, and I think that was the biggest difference.”

Harlan County (25-8) appeared to be in trouble again, trailing 2-0 in the fifth inning when the momentum turned in the Lady Bears on a line drive hit to right-center by Farren Clark. WIth Nikki Creech on first after a single, Clark drilled a rope into the gap that appeared to stay up just long enough for Middlesboro right fielder Taylor Moyers to make the catch. Just as Moyers reached out for the ball while running at full speed, she collided with center fielder Bailey Hensley. Neither Moyers nor Hensley were able to get up after the collision, allowing Creech and Clark both to score on what turned out to be a two-run inside-the-park homer.

“I didn’t see the collision,” McElyea said. “I looked up and Farren was already on me at third base. A play like that had to turn the momentum.”

Middlesboro coach Luster Powers agreed.

“It was big,” he said. “Anything can happen in softball, and that did seem to give them the momentum, but they hit it well. They hit Madison (Shields) hard.”

Shields suffered her first loss after three wins against the Lady Bears, giving up six runs on eight hits in six-plus innings on the mound. Lauren Spurlock gave up two hits in one inning.

Destinee Jenkins earned the win as she gave up both runs on four hits, while striking out five and walking three. Kacie Russell recorded two big outs, ending both the fourth and sixth innings, before Jenkins returned to the mound each time.

“(Assistant coach) Marcus (Johnson) makes the pitching calls and he said he might do that,” McElyea said. “It worked out great. Destinee pitched a great game, but Kacie came in and did the job when we needed her to get us out of a couple jams.”

Creech and Clark ignited the HCHS offense at the top of the order with two hits each. Haley Blakley also added two singles. Destinee Jenkins had a double. Kacie Russell, Hannah Johnson and Jessie Johnson contributed one single each.

Harlan County took over after the collision and a lengthy delay afterwards. Both players were taken to the dugout, but the game was stopped, even after substitutes had been announced. Both players returned to the field before the game resumed.

The Lady Bears took the lead in the sixth inning with three runs. Hannah Johnson walked with one out and Lainey Cox was safe on an error with two outs. Jessie Johnson and Creech each delivered with big two-out hits as Johnson drove in one run and Creech brought home two.

“Jessie and Nikki had huge hits for us,” McElyea said. “We had some big hits, but I think our defense won it for us. I think our tough schedule paid off for us tonight.”

Jenkins led off the seventh inning with a double off the fence in left, marking the end of the night on the mound for Shields. Hannah Johnson’s two-hit off Spurlock’s glove gave the Lady Bears an insurance run.

Middlesboro (20-9) scored both of its runs in the third inning. Sarah Brooks reached base on catcher interference and Laura Durham singled. Spurllock singled home one run, and Erica Gambrell’s ground out to first base brought in the other.

Moyers, Durham, Spurlock and Shields had one hit each for the Lady Jackets.

Both teams advance to the 13th Region Tournament opening Monday at Knox Central.

———

Harlan County* 000* 023* 1* — 6 10 2

Middlesboro* 002* 000* 0* — 2 4 1

Jenkins, Russell (4), Jenkins (5), Russell (6), Jenkins (7) and King; Shields, Spurlock (7) and Durham. WP — Jenkins. LP — Shields.

Photos by Anthony Cloud | Daily News Lainey Cox caught a fly ball in right field during Wednesday’s victory over Middlesboro.
http://harlandaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_Carmen-Cox-1.jpgPhotos by Anthony Cloud | Daily News Lainey Cox caught a fly ball in right field during Wednesday’s victory over Middlesboro.

Madison Shields threw a runner out at first during Wednesday’s district championship game.
http://harlandaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_Shields-to-Spurlock-1.jpgMadison Shields threw a runner out at first during Wednesday’s district championship game.

Kim Henson | Daily Enterprise Destinee Jenkins delivered a pitch in the 52nd District Tournament championship game Wednesday. Jenkins was the winning pitcher and added a double to earn tournament most valuable player honors in the Lady Bears’ 6-2 win over Middlesboro.
http://harlandaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_KH-Jenkins-in-district-finals-1.jpgKim Henson | Daily Enterprise Destinee Jenkins delivered a pitch in the 52nd District Tournament championship game Wednesday. Jenkins was the winning pitcher and added a double to earn tournament most valuable player honors in the Lady Bears’ 6-2 win over Middlesboro.

Kim Henson | Daily Enterprise Harlan County third baseman Farren Clark connected on a pitch during the fifth inning of Wednesday’s 52nd District Tournament championship game. Clark’s blast turned into a two-run inside-the-park homer to spark the Lady Bears in a 6-2 win over Middlesboro.
http://harlandaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_KH-Clark-vs-Middlesboro-in-district-finals-1.jpgKim Henson | Daily Enterprise Harlan County third baseman Farren Clark connected on a pitch during the fifth inning of Wednesday’s 52nd District Tournament championship game. Clark’s blast turned into a two-run inside-the-park homer to spark the Lady Bears in a 6-2 win over Middlesboro.
HCHS downs Middlesboro in district finals

By John Henson

[email protected]

Reach John Henson at 606-909-4134

Reach John Henson at 606-909-4134

Free meals for students

Harlan Independent approves food program

First Posted: 5:06 pm - May 25th, 2016

By Joe P. Asher - [email protected]



Joe P. Asher|Daily Enterprise Harlan Independent Schools Superintendent C.D. Morton discusses a program that will result in free lunch next school year for all Harlan Independent Schools students.
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The Harlan Independent School Board approved a program during a meeting on Monday that will result in all Harlan Independent students eating for free next school year.

Superintendent C.D. Morton brought up the free meal program shortly after the meeting was called to order.

“This is the one I am the most excited to talk about,” said Morton. “It’s the Community Eligibility Program.”

Morton called on Director of Student Services Emily Clem to bring the board up to speed on the program.

“It’s the program…where all students eat free,” Clem said. “The way you get reimbursed for that is based on your direct certification students.”

Clem explained the percentage of students on government assistance such as SNAP benefits, or direct certification students, plays a major role in eligibility for the program.

“The higher percentage of DC students you have, the more meals you can claim at the free rate,” Clem said. “What you lose in doing this is you lose the money the parent’s pay (for meals).”

Clem advised the board the entire school qualifies for the program.

“There are different options we could do,” said Clem. “We could take it through the fourth-grade, or we can take it all the way through 12th-grade.”

Clem pointed out there are advantages for making the program school-wide.

“It’s better for our school for everybody to eat free,” Clem said. “It would be a bad scenario if you go all the way through fourth-grade, and then fifth-grade you have to start paying.”

Clem pointed out 40 percent of enrolled students must be direct certification students to be eligible.

Board Chairman Joe Meadors asked Clem if the numbers were there to allow the entire school to eat free.

“I feel like we are,” replied Clem. “It’s a gamble, but they do have a calculator to help project. I’ve used the calculator.”

Clem explained she examined the figures using the month of March as a guide.

“If everything stayed the same…it’s saying that we would make – if we went school-wide – around $700 more a month. I think if we go free for everybody we’re going to have a lot of kids eat that don’t normally eat.”

Clem said she felt it would be feasible to provide free meals school-wide.

“It would be my recommendation that we do the Community Eligibility provision K -12 for the 2016-2017 school year,” Morton said.

The board passed a motion approving free meals for all students next school year.

Reach Joe P. Asher at 606-909-4132 or on Twitter @joe_hde

Joe P. Asher|Daily Enterprise Harlan Independent Schools Superintendent C.D. Morton discusses a program that will result in free lunch next school year for all Harlan Independent Schools students.
http://harlandaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_Morton.jpgJoe P. Asher|Daily Enterprise Harlan Independent Schools Superintendent C.D. Morton discusses a program that will result in free lunch next school year for all Harlan Independent Schools students.
Harlan Independent approves food program

By Joe P. Asher

[email protected]

Endangerment indictment

Man allegedly threatened woman, fired gun

First Posted: 4:36 pm - May 25th, 2016

By Joe P. Asher - [email protected]



Donnie Riechman
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A Cumberland man has been indicted on charges including wanton endangerment after allegedly shooting a gun in the air and threatening to shoot a woman.

Donnie Riechman, 37, was arrested on an indictment warrant by Harlan County Sheriff’s Deputy Bill Howard on Tuesday.

According to the indictment handed down by the grand jury on Feb. 1, Riechman created substantial danger of death or injury to another person on Aug. 31, 2010, by shooting a gun in the air after threatening to shoot a female. The four-count indictment also states Riechman, a convicted felon, was in possession of a handgun.

Riechman was indicted for first-degree wanton endangerment, possession of a handgun by a convicted felon, third-degree terroristic threatening and second-degree persistent felony offender.

He was lodged in the Harlan County Detention Center on a $5,000 surety bond.

In other police activity:

• Gary W. Goins, 40, of Lynch, was served an indictment warrant on Monday. Goins was indicted for manufacturing methamphetamine, first-degree controlled substance endangerment to a child, first-degree possession of a controlled substance and possession of drug paraphernalia, endangering the welfare of a minor and second degree persistent felony offender. He was lodged in the Harlan County Detention Center on a $25,000 full cash bond;

• Lawrence Lucas, 33, of Lynch, was served with an indictment warrant on Tuesday by Benham City Police Chief Ryan Shepherd. Lucas was indicted for first-degree possession of a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia and second-degree persistent felony offender. He was lodged in the Harlan County Detention Center;

• Samantha Smith, 29, of Harlan, was served an indictment warrant at the Harlan Detention Center on Tuesday. She was indicted for two counts each of manufacturing methamphetamine, unlawful possession of a meth precursor and first-degree possession of a controlled substance. She was lodged in the Harlan County Detention Center on a $3,000 full cash bond.

Reach Joe P. Asher at 606-909-4132 or on Twitter @joe_hde

Donnie Riechman
http://harlandaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_DonnieRiechman.jpgDonnie Riechman
Man allegedly threatened woman, fired gun

By Joe P. Asher

[email protected]

Spring recital slated Saturday

First Posted: 4:35 pm - May 25th, 2016

Photo submitted Harlan County Dance Extreme will present “My Favorite Things” Spring Recital at 6 p.m. on Saturday at James A Cawood Elementary School theatre. The cost is $5 per person. Dancers from around Harlan County will be performing, ballet, jazz, tap, clogging and lyrical dances. A crowd-pleaser is sure to be the father/daughter dance to Jordan Smith’s song, “You are so beautiful.”
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Photo submitted

Harlan County Dance Extreme will present “My Favorite Things” Spring Recital at 6 p.m. on Saturday at James A Cawood Elementary School theatre. The cost is $5 per person. Dancers from around Harlan County will be performing, ballet, jazz, tap, clogging and lyrical dances. A crowd-pleaser is sure to be the father/daughter dance to Jordan Smith’s song, “You are so beautiful.”

Photo submitted Harlan County Dance Extreme will present “My Favorite Things” Spring Recital at 6 p.m. on Saturday at James A Cawood Elementary School theatre. The cost is $5 per person. Dancers from around Harlan County will be performing, ballet, jazz, tap, clogging and lyrical dances. A crowd-pleaser is sure to be the father/daughter dance to Jordan Smith’s song, “You are so beautiful.”
http://harlandaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_Dance-Extreme.jpgPhoto submitted Harlan County Dance Extreme will present “My Favorite Things” Spring Recital at 6 p.m. on Saturday at James A Cawood Elementary School theatre. The cost is $5 per person. Dancers from around Harlan County will be performing, ballet, jazz, tap, clogging and lyrical dances. A crowd-pleaser is sure to be the father/daughter dance to Jordan Smith’s song, “You are so beautiful.”

Junior Chef Team wins regional competition

First Posted: 4:34 pm - May 25th, 2016

By Mark Bell - For the Enterprise



Photo submitted Pictured are, from left: Superintendent Mike Howard, Leilani Kelly, Cade Burton, coach Bonita Duncan, Whitney Barger, Breanna Faulkner, Stacey Huff and Jose’ Roque.
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Harlan County High School’s Junior Chef Team won first place recently in the fourth annual 13th Region Junior Chef Competition, hosted for the first time at HCHS.

Bill Wickliffe and Tina Garland of the Kentucky Department of Agriculture judged the competition that included three other participating schools from the region: Jackson County, Whitley County and Letcher County Central.

“This is the toughest competition we have seen, with the largest crowd,” Wickliffe said.

The Harlan County team won the competition with their unique recipe “The Bear Paw Quiche,” which included 12 “Kentucky Proud” ingredients.

The dishes were judged based on taste, appearance, creativity, as well as the best and greatest use of local ingredients. Other criteria included meeting state and federal guidelines for food preparation and content, that the recipes be appropriate for school food service programs and also kid-friendly.

This win advances the Harlan County team to state-level competition in Louisville in August where coach Bonita Duncan says she is “confident the students will do well” as they compete with students from other outstanding programs for scholarships, awards and prizes at the Kentucky State Fair.

Mike Howard, superintendent of Harlan County Schools, attended and was “impressed by the enthusiasm of the students and staff involved.”

The idea behind the “Junior Chef” program is to provide high school students with opportunities to learn about agriculture, marketing, teamwork and community involvement.

“I was impressed by all the teams that competed and honored that Harlan County won,” said Jack Miniard, director of food service for Harlan County Schools. “I’d also like to thank the superintendent, the board and the principal of Harlan County High School for allowing us to host and be a part of this event.”

Photo submitted Pictured are, from left: Superintendent Mike Howard, Leilani Kelly, Cade Burton, coach Bonita Duncan, Whitney Barger, Breanna Faulkner, Stacey Huff and Jose’ Roque.
http://harlandaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_HCHS-Junior-Chef-Team.jpgPhoto submitted Pictured are, from left: Superintendent Mike Howard, Leilani Kelly, Cade Burton, coach Bonita Duncan, Whitney Barger, Breanna Faulkner, Stacey Huff and Jose’ Roque.

By Mark Bell

For the Enterprise

Health insurance rate hike requests average 17 percent in Ky

First Posted: 4:33 pm - May 25th, 2016

By Adam Beam - Associated Press



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FRANKFORT (AP) — Health insurance companies in Kentucky want to increase rates by an average of 17 percent next year, continuing a national trend of hefty hikes as insurers adapt to a market reshaped by President Barack Obama’s signature health care law.

The rate increases cover individual and small group plans. They do not include large plans offered by employers. Those rate requests will be released at a later date.

Kentucky is one of 13 states that operate its own health insurance exchange, a website where people can purchase discounted private insurance plans with the help of federal subsidies. Republican Gov. Matt Bevin plans to dismantle that state exchange, named kynect, by the end of this year. Its plans and customers would be shifted to the federal exchange HealthCare.gov.

Plans sold on the exchange are requesting rate hikes averaging 20 percent, compared to an average increase of 16 percent of plans sold off the exchange.

Save Kentucky Healthcare, a nonprofit started by former Democratic Gov. Steve Beshear to advocate for kynect, said in a statement “we believe the main reason why insurance companies are proposing higher rates is because of the uncertainty of the future of kynect.”

But Anthem health Plans of Kentucky, the only company that will offers plans statewide on the exchange next year, said the requested rate increase has nothing to do with the end of kynect. Instead, spokesman Mark Robinson blamed the increase on the failure of the Kentucky Health Cooperative, a nonprofit started with the help of a $58.8 million federal grant that folded last year. Its 51,000 mostly high-risk customers had to be picked up by other companies.

“The biggest issue for us honestly is the uncertainty of all of those members,” Robinson said. “How sick or healthy are they?”

But the rate increases, if approved by state regulators, do not guarantee double-digit increases in the monthly premiums people have to pay. The base rate is one of many factors companies use to determine how much someone pays in a monthly premium. Other factors include age, sex and where a person lives.

Last year, after insurance companies across the country requested double-digit rate increases in many states, the average monthly premium for plans sold on the federal exchange increased $4, to $106 per month from $102 per month, according to Jonathan Gold, a spokesman for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

“People in Kentucky understand how the marketplace works, and they know that they can shop around and find coverage that fits their needs and budget,” Gold said. “The vast majority of consumers in Kentucky qualify for tax credits that reduce the cost of coverage below the sticker price.”

But many Kentucky counties only have one company offering health plans on the exchange. Some counties have as many as six plans to choose from, both on and off the exchange.

The largest requested increase was 65.1 percent from the Golden Rule Insurance Company, which is owned by UnitedHealthcare. That company does not offer plans on the state exchange. A spokeswoman did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Bevin spokeswoman Jessica Ditto said the Affordable Care Act is failing and hurting the state, offering the rate increases as proof that the state needs “a sustainable healthcare model tailored for Kentucky.” Bevin wants to repeal the state’s expanded Medicaid program and replace it with a system similar to one in Indiana, where some Medicaid recipients pay small premiums for their insurance.

By Adam Beam

Associated Press

Lady Bears rout HHS, 8-0

First Posted: 3:51 pm - May 25th, 2016

By Anthony Cloud - [email protected]



Anthony Cloud | Daily News Destinee Jenkins picked up the win on Tuesday after striking out five batters and only allowing one hit through 5 2/3 innings.
Kaitlyn Jenkins tried to beat out the throw to first during Tuesday’s district semifinal game.
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Harlan held on for the better half of four innings but couldn’t produce any offense as Harlan County walked away with an 8-0 victory on Tuesday to advance to the 52nd District championship against Middlesboro.

“Harlan came out and small-balled a lot. Our defense reacted well,” said Harlan County coach Tim McElyea. “Our infield got a good workout. That’s a good thing because we fielded a lot of bunts and slaps tonight.”

“Tomorrow’s game, Middlesboro’s had our number for a long time. I just hope we’re competitive and (I) hope it’s a good game. They’ve got a good club and a couple of good arms. I just hope that we can make it a good game and see what happens at the end.”

The Lady Bears held a two-run lead through three innings before adding three runs in the fourth and two in the fifth to secure the victory.

Destinee Jenkins was credited with the win after allowing only one hit through 5 2/3 innings. She also finished the game with five strikeouts and one walk.

“We’ve been working hard all week. I think she’s on top of her game right now, and we’re ready for Middlesboro tomorrow,”said pitching coach Marcus Johnson.

Nikki Creech and Jenkins paced Harlan County at the plate going 2-for-4 with one run apiece. Farren Clark finished with two runs on one hit. Haley Blakely, Carmen Cox and Jessie Johnson also scored runs for the Lady Bears.

Madison Brewer picked up the loss for the Lady Dragons. Through 4 2/3 innings, she allowed six hits and eight runs.

Payton Bennett recorded Harlan’s only hit during the game. Jesse Cochran and Sidney Horton also reached base on a walk and error, respectively.

“We tried something different and tried to play a little small ball against them. With our injuries, we basically have nine to 11 players depending what game it is. We tried to work with what we could,” said Harlan coach Scott Lewis. “You’ve got to give credit to Harlan County. They’re a solid team.”

“I’m proud of the way our girls played and the way they fought through. Overall, I think we had a good season with the cards that we were dealt.”

Brewer and Kaitlyn Jenkins are Harlan’s only two seniors on the team.

“I’ve known Madison every since she was probably 8 years old, and Kaitlyn since she was a freshman. That’s going to be a loss. That’s going to be some shoes to fill. I’m very proud of them and the way they played all four years,” said Lewis.

Harlan County took a 2-0 lead in the home half of the first after Clark and Jenkins scored on a fielding error.

Harlan kept the Lady Bears quite until the home half of the fourth. With bases loaded, Carmen Cox scored on a walk to increase the Harlan County lead to 3-0. The Lady Bears widened the gap to 5-0 after Kacie Russell hit a two-run single.

Harlan County finished the game with runs from Blakely, Cox and Creech in the fifth inning to secure the eight-run victory. With the win, the Lady Bears advanced to the district championship game against Middlesboro on Wednesday.

Reach Anthony Cloud at 606-302-9090 or on Twitter @AnthonyCloudMDN

Anthony Cloud | Daily News Destinee Jenkins picked up the win on Tuesday after striking out five batters and only allowing one hit through 5 2/3 innings.
http://harlandaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_Destinee-Jenkins-1.jpgAnthony Cloud | Daily News Destinee Jenkins picked up the win on Tuesday after striking out five batters and only allowing one hit through 5 2/3 innings.

Kaitlyn Jenkins tried to beat out the throw to first during Tuesday’s district semifinal game.
http://harlandaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_Kaitlyn-Jenkins.jpgKaitlyn Jenkins tried to beat out the throw to first during Tuesday’s district semifinal game.

By Anthony Cloud

[email protected]

Safe delivery of healthy babies

First Posted: 2:20 pm - May 25th, 2016

By Kristal Burke, RN - Contributing Writer



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LUNCH & LEARN

Harlan ARH Hospital will present the Lunch & Learn series at noon on May 27 at the hospital’s One West Conference Room. Kristal Burke, RN, will speak on safe delivery of healthy babies. There will be a free lunch and giveaways. For more information including a reservation, contact Mark Bell at 606-573-8208 or [email protected]

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Recently, the outbreak of the Zika virus has made international news and raised alarms about the risks this mosquito-borne illness presents to unborn babies.

This is certainly a new and urgent threat to mothers and the babies they carry. The attention surrounding the outbreak is intense and growing.

While the risk for complications from that appears low in our community for the moment, we will be learning more as public health experts determine how best to protect ourselves and those yet to be born.

Still, the best way to assure your baby is born healthy and safe is to carry it to its full term. Everybody says that’s nine months, but doctors say, for the vast majority of expectant mothers, 39 weeks is the proper amount of time.

Many times mothers-to-be have reasons for wanting to deliver early, some for medical reasons but often for reasons of personal convenience. Because an early delivery creates risks for the baby, it’s important for moms to focus less on the delivery event and more on what they want for their child.

Most moms want a healthy baby that’s able to eat and breathe on its own. They want their child to have a healthy life, to be able to see and hear, to learn and solve problems as they grow, and to be able to get along with others.

The advice list to accomplish this is pretty brief:

• Take a prenatal vitamin every day;

• Don’t smoke, drink alcohol or abuse drugs;

• Eat healthy;

• Be physically active;

• Get enough sleep;

• Keep your doctor appointments, even if you’re feeling just fine; and

• Stay pregnant for at least 39 weeks.

It is during the last few weeks of a baby’s development in the womb that important growth takes place in the brain, eyes, ears, lungs and liver. A baby’s brain at 35 weeks weighs only two-thirds of what it will weigh at 39-40 weeks.

It’s also very important to remember that your due date is an estimate. It could be off by a week or two. So, if you choose to have your baby at 37 weeks and the estimated due date is actually off by two weeks, your baby will be brought into the world with an underdeveloped brain, sensory organs and glands.

Our goal is to help you have a healthy pregnancy and safely deliver a healthy child. It’s important for you to ask questions, understand what you need to do to have the best possible outcome, and prepare for what you really want — to safely deliver and then nurture a healthy child.

I will be discussing these issues in person on Friday at the hospital’s monthly Lunch & Learn program in the One West Conference Room. I hope to see you there at noon.

Kristal Burke, RN, is the obstetrics unit nurse manager at Harlan ARH Hospital

http://harlandaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_Kristal-Burke.jpg

http://harlandaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_N0912P31004C.jpg

By Kristal Burke, RN

Contributing Writer

LUNCH & LEARN

Harlan ARH Hospital will present the Lunch & Learn series at noon on May 27 at the hospital’s One West Conference Room. Kristal Burke, RN, will speak on safe delivery of healthy babies. There will be a free lunch and giveaways. For more information including a reservation, contact Mark Bell at 606-573-8208 or [email protected]